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Clandestine Channels and Networks

  • John B. Wolf
Part of the Criminal Justice and Public Safety book series (CJPS)

Abstract

Soviet deliveries of arms to Third World countries began in 1954 in the form of a shipment of weapons from Czechoslovakia to Egypt. Shipments are usually accompanied by a high-profile military presence. Fifty-thousand Communist military advisers—instructors, technical personnel, and troops—are on assignment in the developing countries, and of these, approximately two-thirds are Cubans and the rest are from the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe.l

Keywords

Police Officer Terrorist Group Guerrilla Group Dade County Automatic Rifle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.
    J. C. Hurewitz, Middle East Politics: The Military Dimension ( New York: Frederick A. Praeger, 1969 ), pp. 438–456.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Beatriz Ruiz de la Mata, “P.R. Terrorists Feared by U.S. Installations,” The San Juan Star (Puerto Rico), August 31, 1985, p. 13.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Elaine Sciolino, “U.S. Finds Output of Drugs in World Growing Sharply,” The New York Times, March 2, 1988, p. 1.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    John B. Wolf, “Cuba Supplies U.S. Addicts in Destabilization Bid,” New York City Tribune, May 13, 1986, p. 2 and idem, “Cuban-Colombian Narco-Terrorist Crop Flourishes,” ibid., October 14, 1986, p. 2.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    John B. Wolf, “Cuban Bandits Bound by Vows and Saint Worship,” Neto York City Tribune, July 8, 1986, p. 2.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Stephen Engelberg with Elaine Sciolino, “A U.S. Frame-Up of Nicaragua Charged,” The New York Times, February 2, 1988, p. 1.Google Scholar
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    William Borders, “3 British Soldiers Slain in Belfast,” The New York Times,March 26, 1982, p. 2.Google Scholar
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    Richard D. Lyons, “U.S. Says It Has Broken an I.R.A. Ring That Crossed from Canada to Buy Weapons,” The New York Times,March 1, 1982, p. Bl.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Irish Aid Efforts in U.S. Still Strong,“ The Neto York Times, September 8, 1981, p. 11.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    James Brooke, “Angola Guerrilla Describes U.S. Aid,” The New York Times,December 15, 1987, p. 4.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Trumbull Higgins, The Perfect Failure: Kennedy, Eisenhower, and the C.I.A. at the Bay of Pigs (New York: W. W. Norton, 1987), pp. 24, 30, 51, 64.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    John B. Wolf, “U.S. Aerial Supply Operations for Anti-Leftists Told to Captors,” New York City Tribune, February 16, 1988, p. 2.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    John B. Wolf, “Americans Said to Fly Aid to Central American, African Rebels,” New York City Tribune, January 5, 1988, p. 2.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Bob Woodward, Veil: The Secret Wars of the C.I.A. 1981–1987 ( New York: Simon & Schuster, 1987 ), p. 268.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    John B. Wolf, “SAM and Stinger Missiles Find Way to Hands of IRA, Others,” New York City Tribune, January 26, 1988, p. 2.Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Engelberg with Sciolino, “A U.S. Frame-Up,” p. 1.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • John B. Wolf

There are no affiliations available

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