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An in Vitro Approach for Interspecies Extrapolation Using Animal and Human Airway Epithelial Cell Culture

  • M. Emura
  • M. Riebe
  • U. Mohr
  • J. Jacob
  • G. Grimmer
  • J. Wen
  • M. Straub
Chapter

Abstract

To assess the risk of cancer development we usually need to extrapolate data from laboratory experiments to the human situation. There is, however, a wide variety of both qualitative and quantitative results from studies with different mammalian species. To cite but a few examples, incubation of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) with the microsomal preparations from respiratory organs produced predominantly trans4,5-dihydro-4,5-dihydroxybenzo(a)pyrene (trans-4,5-diol) in rats and rhesus monkeys, while in Syrian hamsters and humans trans-7,8-diol was produced (see review by Cohen and Ashurst, 1983). Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and cigarette smoke induce tumors of the respiratory organs in the pulmonary peripheral region in rats, in the pulmonary hilar region in humans and in the upper respiratory tract in Syrian hamsters (see review by Mohr and Dungworth, 1988). In the respiratory tract cell cultures, 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) enhanced colony formation of rat cells, while it was inhibitory to hamster and human cells (Beeman et al., 1987). We should, therefore, recognize such species-dependent variations and try to understand the mechanisms underlying their occurrence to make the extrapolation more accurate.

Keywords

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Syrian Hamster Thymidine Uptake Tracheal Epithelial Cell Anchorage Independency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Emura
    • 1
  • M. Riebe
    • 1
  • U. Mohr
    • 1
  • J. Jacob
    • 2
  • G. Grimmer
    • 2
  • J. Wen
    • 1
  • M. Straub
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für Experimentelle PathologieMedizinische Hochschule HannoverHannover 61Germany
  2. 2.Biochemisches Institut für UmweltcarcinogeneGrosshansdorfGermany

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