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Development of Polymers with Anti-Infectious Properties

  • B. Jansen
  • G. Peters
  • S. Schareina
  • H. Steinhauser
  • F. Schumacher-Perdreau
  • G. Pulverer
Part of the Polymer Science and Technology book series (PST, volume 38)

Abstract

The significance of foreign-body infections caused by bacteria is discussed. The aspects of bacterial adhesion to polymeric materials, which is regarded as a first important step in the development of foreign-body infections, are discussed. With this background, possible strategies for the prevention of bacterial adhesion to polymers are presented. Hydrophilic surface modification of polymers, performed by radiation-grafting or glow discharge treatment, reduces the number of bacterial cells in vitro. The possibility of surface modification for the selective adsorption of blood proteins and its effect on bacterial adhesion is considered. As another approach, attachment or incorporation of antibiotic drugs onto or into polymers, with the aim to prevent adhesion or to kill adhered bacteria, is presented. Preliminary experiments with antibiotic-loaded polymers show that the released drugs still possess their activity. A reduction of bacterial adhesion is observed for polymers into which the antibiotic was incorporated.

Keywords

Acrylic Acid Glow Discharge Surface Free Energy Water Contact Angle Polymer Surface 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Jansen
    • 1
  • G. Peters
    • 1
  • S. Schareina
    • 1
  • H. Steinhauser
    • 1
    • 2
  • F. Schumacher-Perdreau
    • 1
  • G. Pulverer
    • 1
  1. 1.Hygiene-InstituteUniversity of CologneCologne 41Germany
  2. 2.Institute of Physical ChemistryUniversity of CologneCologne 41Germany

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