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Assessment of Ecologic Risks Related to Chemical Exposure: Methods and Strategies Used in the United States

  • J. W. Falco
  • R. V. Moraski
Part of the NATO · Challenges of Modern Society book series (NATS, volume 12)

Abstract

At present, the United States has yet to develop government- or agency-wide guidelines for conducting ecologic risk assessments; however, various standard test methods have been developed to provide toxicologic benchmarks. The earliest of these methods measured acute toxicologic effects, but as this field of science progressed, methods to measure chronic effects were also developed. Most recently, research efforts have been directed toward developing test methods that predict chronic and acute toxicologic effects based on results of short-term exposure of organisms during sensitive life stages.

Keywords

Ecologic Risk Ecologic Risk Assessment Annual Book Disturbed Ecosystem Ecosystem Risk 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. W. Falco
    • 1
  • R. V. Moraski
    • 2
  1. 1.Office of Environmental Processes and Effects ResearchUnited States Environmental Protection AgencyUSA
  2. 2.Office of Health and Environmental AssessmentUnited States Environmental Protection AgencyUSA

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