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The Emergence of Environment—Behavior Research in Zoological Parks

  • Janaea Martin
  • Joseph O’Reilly
Part of the Human Behavior and Environment book series (HUBE, volume 10)

Abstract

Animal—environment research in the zoological park dates back to the turn of the 20th century. In 1896, Robert Garner proposed that enclosure design be based upon the scientific examination of biological and social behavior of an imals. There also is a tradition of informal investigations of the physical environment in designing for keeper safety and for solving problems involving human interaction with physical elements of zoological parks. However, systematic environment-behavior research within zoological parks has emerged only quite recently.

Keywords

American Association Annual Proceeding Sage Publication Zoological Society Zoological Garden 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Janaea Martin
    • 1
  • Joseph O’Reilly
    • 2
  1. 1.Program in Social EcologyUniversity of California-IrvineIrvineUSA
  2. 2.Mesa Public SchoolsMesaUSA

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