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Women and Urban Public Space

Research, Design, and Policy Issues
  • Karen A. Franck
  • Lynn Paxson
Part of the Human Behavior and Environment book series (HUBE, volume 10)

Abstract

The new and growing field of women and environments has focused almost exclusively on women’s activities and needs in the home and the adjacent neighborhood with little research on women’s use of urban public spaces.1 The exceptions are studies of specific problems including crime and fear of crime (Gordon, Riger, LeBailly, & Heath, 1981), transportation (Cichoki, 1981; Fox, 1985), and some historical research (Cranz, 1981; Peiss, 1986; Stansell, 1986). Research on urban public spaces has also been growing (Carr, Francis, Rivlin, & Stone, in press; Francis, 1987; Francis, Cashdan, & Paxson, 1984; Whyte, 1980) but pays almost no attention to gender differences in the use of these spaces. Both areas of research are important, but they have not yet generated a theoretical perspective to guide future research on women and public space. The goal of this chapter is to develop just such a perspective.2

Keywords

Public Space Public Transit Community Garden Discretionary Activity Wage Work 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karen A. Franck
    • 1
  • Lynn Paxson
    • 2
  1. 1.School of ArchitectureNew Jersey Institute of TechnologyNewarkUSA
  2. 2.Environmental Psychology Program, Graduate CenterCity University of New YorkNew YorkUSA

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