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Managing Parks as Human Ecosystems

  • Gary E. Machlis
Part of the Human Behavior and Environment book series (HUBE, volume 10)

Abstract

It is late spring in a western national park. As the air and soil warm with longer days, the snow melts, and the alpine meadows are increasingly uncovered. Bear move in the lower valleys, and backpackers begin a yearly migration along their favorite routes to camping sites at the high elevations. As the spring turns to early summer, the number of employees and visitors climb, gift shops and restaurants open, the payrolls grow, electricity, water, and gasoline consump tion rise. Underground, sewer systems flow at increased rates, leach fields swell, wildflowers break through along roadways and trails. The pace of life in the park quickens, for the deer, elk, fish, and people.

Keywords

National Park Giant Panda Human Ecology Park Management General System Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary E. Machlis
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Forest Resources, College of Forestry, Wildlife, and Range SciencesUniversity of IdahoMoscowUSA

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