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The Attractiveness and Use of Aquatic Environments as Outdoor Recreation Places

  • David G. Pitt
Part of the Human Behavior and Environment book series (HUBE, volume 10)

Abstract

Water is a dominant feature in many environments. The United States, a nation of some 2.3 billion acres, has approximately 110 million acres of water surface, 3.6 million linear miles of rivers and streams, approximately 100,000 miles of coastal and Great Lakes shoreline, over 100,000 natural lakes, 2.5 million farm ponds, and a land area submerged under man-made reservoirs that exceeds the size of New Hampshire and Vermont combined. Roughly one-third of the U.S. population lives within five miles of a public lake, river, stream, or coastal shoreline (Lime, 1983).

Keywords

Aquatic Environment Managerial Context Outdoor Recreation Landscape Preference River Recreation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • David G. Pitt
    • 1
  1. 1.Landscape Architecture ProgramUniversity of MinnesotaSt. PaulUSA

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