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Risk Assessment Using Test Results

  • Julia Pet-Edwards
  • Yacov Y. Haimes
  • Vira Chankong
  • Herbert S. Rosenkranz
  • Fanny K. Ennever

Abstract

Consider the situation in which we would like to determine whether some object has a certain property. For example, the object might be a chemical and the unknown property might be the potential carcinogenicity of the chemical. Suppose, further, that we have a set of tests that we can use to help us determine whether the property is present in the object. In Chapter 3 we discussed several analyses for computing the performances of the tests and the interdependencies between the pairs of tests, and in Chapter 4 we discussed how one can select the “best” battery of tests to use for a particular application. In this chapter, it is assumed that we have chosen a battery to use, we have applied this battery on the object, and now we must interpret the results of this battery.

Keywords

Risk Assessment Posterior Probability Prior Probability Preceding Equation Sequential Formulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Reference

  1. Pet-Edwards, J., 1986, “Selection and interpretation of conditionally dependent tests for binary predictions: A Bayesian approach,” Ph.D. dissertation, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julia Pet-Edwards
    • 1
  • Yacov Y. Haimes
    • 1
  • Vira Chankong
    • 2
  • Herbert S. Rosenkranz
    • 2
  • Fanny K. Ennever
    • 2
  1. 1.University of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA
  2. 2.Case Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA

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