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Electrophysiological Properties of Uterine Smooth Muscle

  • C. Y. Kao

Abstract

Until recently almost all knowledge of the electrophysiological properties of the myometrium and other mammalian smooth muscles was based on descriptive observations of some natural phenomena or on modifications of such phenomena by changes in the ionic environment or produced by hormonal and pharmacological agents. Although much of value has been learned about the resting and action potentials and their relationship to contractions, the information derived from such approaches was limited because of the nature of the methods. In the previous edition of this book, substantial revisions were incorporated into this chapter to include advances then being made with the introduction of certain analytical methods for studying the electrophysiological properties of mammalian smooth muscles. For instance, basic electrical properties of some smooth muscle preparations were being unmasked by the polarization method of Abe and Tomita (1968), and the nature of the ionic currents, their equilibrium potentials, and some aspects of the ionic conductances were being identified by use of the double-sucrose-gap voltage-clamp method (Anderson, 1969; Kao and McCullough, 1975; Inomata and Kao, 1976). All that information, fulfilling a need then existing, was also flawed, because it had to be obtained on multicellular preparations, which presented formidable technical obstacles to an unambiguous understanding of the underlying cellular processes.

Keywords

Outward Current Spike Discharge Uterine Smooth Muscle Myometrial Cell Spike Threshold 
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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Y. Kao
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PharmacologyState University of New York Downstate Medical CenterBrooklynUSA

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