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Everyday Cognition and the Ecological Validity of Intellectual and Neuropsychological Tests

  • J. Michael Williams
Part of the Human Neuropsychology book series (HN)

Abstract

The notions of ecological validity and everyday cognition emerged predominantly from three sources in psychology. These were the study of practical intelligence in cognitive psychology (Sternberg, 1977; Neisser, 1982), the study of everyday cognition in gerontology (Acker, 1986; Poon, 1986; West, 1985) and the prediction of everyday functioning in neuropsychological rehabilitation settings (Chelune & Moehle, 1986; Hart & Hayden, 1986). Movements in all of these areas were at least partially motivated by a reaction to the general psychometric, trait-oriented theories of intelligence and the arcane style of intellectual and neuropsychological tests which had developed largely since the second world war. The following is a very brief history of these movements, a review of the current ideas subsumed under the term ecological validity and a future program of test development which will presumably combine these new ideas with the best from the past.

Keywords

Neuropsychological Test Ecological Validity Clinical Memory Everyday Functioning Everyday Task 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Michael Williams

There are no affiliations available

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