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An Integrated Approach to the Neuropsychological Assessment of Cognitive Function

  • Robert L. Mapou
Part of the Human Neuropsychology book series (HN)

Abstract

Historically, results of neuropsychological assessment have been used to determine the presence and location of brain damage. As neurodiagnostic technology has advanced, the focus of assessment has begun to shift from localization to delineation of cognitive function. Cognition, however, is an internal process and cannot be observed. In contrast, performance on a neuropsychological test is observable. According to Kaplan (1983), neuropsychological tests are instruments which are used to elicit behavior which the examiner may observe. From these observations, the experienced neuropsychologist may then make inferences about the patient’s cognition.

Keywords

Word List Neuropsychological Assessment Brain Damage Memory Disorder Cognitive Neuropsychology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert L. Mapou

There are no affiliations available

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