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Adult Cognition: Neuropsychological Evidence and Developmental Models

  • Susan Kotler-Cope
  • Fredda Blanchard-Fields
  • Wm. Drew Gouvier
Part of the Human Neuropsychology book series (HN)

Abstract

Neurologists and neuropsychologists have long been aware that cognitive functions change as a consequence of brain injury. Indeed, this assumption forms the basis of the diagnosis and treatment of brain-injured patients. Recently, cognitive psychologists have rediscovered the important role such deficits can play in elucidating aspects of normal cognitive functioning (Jacoby & Witherspoon, 1982; Schacter, 1988). Developmental theorists seeking to establish models of cognitive development have also begun to acknowledge the relevance of neuropsychological research to their theories (Labouvie-Vief, 1985). Neurologists and neuropsychologists also acknowledge that cognitive functioning changes as a consequence of aging. Recent arguments concerning the nature and the significance of these changes, however, have generated considerable controversy. A coherent and comprehensive developmental framework which accounts for age-related cognitive changes would be of great practical and theoretical benefit to neuropsychologists. To facilitate continued progress in neuropsychology, it is desirable to give consideration to the current theories and research in cognitive developmental psychology. Of particular significance for neuropsychology is the recent emphasis on developing models of adult cognition and detailing the effects of the normal aging processes on a variety of cognitive functions.

Keywords

Cognitive Functioning Brain Damage Senile Dementia Fluid Intelligence Normal Aging Process 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan Kotler-Cope
  • Fredda Blanchard-Fields
  • Wm. Drew Gouvier

There are no affiliations available

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