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Neuropsychological Aspects of Simultaneous and Successive Cognitive Processes

  • Seija Äystö
Part of the Human Neuropsychology book series (HN)

Abstract

Information processing models have been a widely used approach in cognitive psychology for the last three decades (e.g., Miller, Galanter & Pribram, 1960; Neisser, 1967; Lindsey & Norman, 1972; Newell & Simon, 1972). In recent years, intelligence, memory and associated abilities have been approached from the perspective of information processing (e.g., Das, Kirby & Jarman, 1975, 1979; Hunt, 1980; Kail & Pellegrino, 1985; Klatzky, 1984; Sternberg, 1985). The static and fixed nature of abilities is challenged by a more flexible and dynamic approach which attempts to study shared qualities in human intellectual functioning and to measure individual cognitive differences.

Keywords

Digit Span Elderly Sample Successive Processing Hemispheric Asymmetry Successive Synthesis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • Seija Äystö

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