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Growth Factor-Related Mechanisms of Leukemogenesis

  • J. W. Schrader
  • K. B. Leslie
  • I. Clark-Lewis
  • H. J. Ziltener
  • S. Schrader
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 34)

Abstract

Acute myeloid leukemia is obviously a heterogeneous disease, different entities being distinguishable by differences in morphology, karyotype, disturbances in the expression of proto-oncogenes, clinical course etc. Some five years ago we made observations that indicated that one mechanism of leukemogenesis involved the malignant cell beginning to produce a hemopoietic growth factor that stimulated its own growth (Schrader and Crapper, 1983). Experiments in which cell-lines have been rendered leukemogenic by infection with retroviruses encoding hemopoietic growth factor genes, have formally confirmed the hypothesis that the inappropriate production of an autostimulatory growth factor by a hemopoietic cell that was immortal but not leukemogenic, could convert the cell to a transplantable leukemia (Lang, et al., 1985; Campbell, et al., 1987 and Nienhuis et al., this volume). Here, we summarize experiments that suggest that perturbations of growth factor production may be a relatively frequent feature of the leukemogenic process and that genetic techniques may allow pinpointing of diseases that involve this mechanism.

Keywords

Acute Myeloid Leukemia Monocytic Leukemia High Density Culture Hemopoietic Cell Exogenous Growth Factor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. W. Schrader
    • 1
    • 2
  • K. B. Leslie
    • 1
    • 2
  • I. Clark-Lewis
    • 2
    • 3
  • H. J. Ziltener
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. Schrader
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.The Biomedical Research CentreUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  2. 2.The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical ResearchMelbourneAustralia
  3. 3.The California Institute of TechnologyPasadenaUSA

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