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Cellular Protection Against Damage by Hydroperoxides: Role of Glutathione

  • John E. Biaglow
  • Marie E. Varnes
  • Edward R. Epp
  • Edward P. Clark
  • Steve Tuttle
  • Kathryn D. Held
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 49)

Abstract

Radicals produced by X-rays may react with oxygen, producing intermediates that are believed to be toxic to cells. We propose a hypothesis that glutathione (GSH) may protect against radiation damage in four ways, as shown in Figure 1.1

Keywords

A549 Cell Radiation Response Pyridine Nucleotide Peroxide Reduction Tertiary Butyl Alcohol 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • John E. Biaglow
    • 1
  • Marie E. Varnes
    • 2
  • Edward R. Epp
    • 3
  • Edward P. Clark
    • 3
  • Steve Tuttle
    • 1
  • Kathryn D. Held
    • 1
  1. 1.University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Case Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA
  3. 3.Harvard UniversityBostonUSA

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