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The Isolation and Partial Characterization of Stable H2O2-Resistant Variants of Chinese Hamster Fibroblasts

  • D. R. Spitz
  • G. C. Li
  • M. L. McCormick
  • Y. Sun
  • L. W. Oberley
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 49)

Abstract

Several groups have reported that bacteria exposed to H2O2 are capable of adapting to H2O2-mediated cytotoxicity.1–3 The adaptation is accompanied by a shift in relative rates of protein synthesis, increased antioxidant enzymatic activity, and increased resistance to other oxidizing agents and radiation.1–4 This adaptation phenomenon has been suggested to be a general response to oxidative stress common to all bacteria.1

Keywords

Catalase Activity Adaptation Phenomenon Chinese Hamster Fibroblast Density Artifact Catalase Isozyme 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. R. Spitz
    • 1
  • G. C. Li
    • 1
  • M. L. McCormick
    • 2
  • Y. Sun
    • 2
  • L. W. Oberley
    • 2
  1. 1.Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory CED-200University of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA
  2. 2.Radiation Research Laboratory Rm. 14 Med. Lab.University of IowaIowa CityUSA

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