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Substituted Phthalocyanines as Photodynamic Sensitizers

  • I. Rosenthal
  • E. Ben-Hur
  • S. Greenberg
  • A. Conception-Lam
  • D. M. Drew
  • C. C. Leznoff
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 49)

Abstract

The phthalocyanine dyes have recently been suggested for use in the photodynamic therapy of cancer.1,2 Their superior attributes, such as the very intense light absorption in the wavelength range preferred for photodynamic therapy (600–700 nm), the lack of toxicity and selective localization of some dyes of this group in experimental tumors, the high efficiency to photosensitize killing of mammalian cells in culture, and finally the ability to induce necroses of transplanted tumors in animals3,4 have made this suggestion very attractive.

Keywords

Singlet Oxygen Photodynamic Therapy Nitroxide Radical Chinese Hamster Cell Zinc Phthalocyanine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. Rosenthal
    • 1
  • E. Ben-Hur
    • 2
  • S. Greenberg
    • 3
  • A. Conception-Lam
    • 3
  • D. M. Drew
    • 3
  • C. C. Leznoff
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Food Science A.R.O.The Volcani Center Bet-DaganIsrael
  2. 2.Department of RadiobiologyNuclear Research CenterNegevIsrael
  3. 3.Department of Chemistry York UniversityCanada

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