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Copper and Copper-Nicotinic Acid Complexes Mediated Oxidation of High Density Lipoprotein

  • Mohamed El-Saadani
  • Hermann Esterbauer
  • Günther Jürgens
  • Mohamed El-Sayed
  • Ahmed Nassar
  • Mohamed Goher
  • Anton Holasek
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 49)

Abstract

Plasma high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol and/or apo A-I levels appear to be inversely related to the occurrence of acute myocardial infarctions and have an impact on the onset and progress of atherosclerosis.1,2 Since the outer surface of the high density lipoprotein particle has a low cholesterol/phosphatidylcholine ratio in comparison to most of the cell membranes,3 it is suggested to be an effective acceptor for the transport of cholesterol to various tissues. HDL facilitates the removal of the peripheral tissue cholesterol and delivers it within the “reverse cholesterol transport” to the liver.4 A recent investigation5 on the scavenger function of sinusoidal liver cells showed that chemically acetylated HDL underwent receptor-mediated endocytosis through a pathway distinct from acetylated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or formaldehyde-treated serum albumin, which suggests the presence of a scavenger receptor for acetylated HDL.

Keywords

High Density Lipoprotein Nicotinic Acid Reverse Cholesterol Transport Isonicotinic Acid High Density Lipoprotein Particle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mohamed El-Saadani
    • 1
  • Hermann Esterbauer
    • 2
  • Günther Jürgens
    • 1
  • Mohamed El-Sayed
    • 3
  • Ahmed Nassar
    • 4
  • Mohamed Goher
    • 3
  • Anton Holasek
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Medical BiochemistryUniversity of GrazGrazAustria
  2. 2.Institute of BiochemistryUniversity of GrazGrazAustria
  3. 3.Faculty of ScienceAlexandria UniversityAlexandriaEgypt
  4. 4.Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine Assuit UniversityAssuit UniversityAssuitEgypt

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