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Is Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein Involved in the Recruitment and Retention of Monocyte/Macrophages in the Artery Wall during the Initiation of Atherosclerosis?

  • Sampath Parthasarathy
  • Mark T. Quinn
  • Daniel Steinberg
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 49)

Abstract

Atheroma or atherosclerosis is a disease affecting major arteries, wherein the intimai layer of the artery is engorged with both intracellular and extracellular lipids, mostly cholesterol esters. Cholesterol, particularly that associated with low density lipoproteins (LDL), has been identified as a major risk factor. The precise mechanism(s) by which LDL cholesterol becomes atherogenic has not been well understood.

Keywords

Foam Cell Chemotactic Activity WHHL Rabbit Cholesteryl Linoleate Cholesteryl Ester Accumulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sampath Parthasarathy
    • 1
  • Mark T. Quinn
    • 1
  • Daniel Steinberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine M-013DUnivesity of CaliforniaSan Diego, La JollaUSA

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