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Effect of Dietary Lipid Peroxides on Lymphoid Tissues

  • Motoko Oarada
  • Teruo Miyazawa
  • Kenshiro Fujimoto
  • Takashi Kaneda
  • Emiko Ito
  • Kiyoshi Terao
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 49)

Abstract

Several studies have been reported of the toxicity and nutritional problems associated with lipid peroxides produced during the autoxidation of oils. Lipid hydroperoxides, the primary oxidation products, and other oxidation products such as ketones, epoxides and aldehydes are thought to be the substances most responsible for the toxicity. (1) However, it has not been shown whether dietary peroxides affect the functions of immunocompetent cells or not. We have reported that methyl U-14C linoleate hydroperoxide and their radioactive secondary oxidation products (carbonyls such as 9-oxo nonanoate and 4-hydroxy nonenal) were absorbed and incorporated into several organs of rats after the oral administration. (2) To appreciate why oxidized oils that occur in foods show lesser nutritional value or toxicity, it seems important to study the effects of dietary peroxides on lymphoid tissues. We studied on the effects on lymphoid tissues of the thymus of mice induced by orally administered methyl linoleate hydroperoxide (MLHPO).

Keywords

Lymphoid Tissue Methyl Linoleate Lipid Hydroperoxide Spleen Weight Methyl Linoleate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    M. Oarada, T. Miyazawa and T. Kaneda, Distribution of 14C after oral administration of U- C-labeled methyl linoleate hydroperoxides and their secondary oxidation products in rats. Lipids 21:150 (1986).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    T. Kaneda and T. Miyazawa, Lipid peroxides and nutrition. Wld. Rev. Nutr. Diet. 50:186 (1987).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Motoko Oarada
    • 1
  • Teruo Miyazawa
    • 1
  • Kenshiro Fujimoto
    • 1
  • Takashi Kaneda
    • 2
  • Emiko Ito
    • 3
  • Kiyoshi Terao
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Food Chemistry, Faculty of AgricultureTohoku UniversitySendai 980Japan
  2. 2.Kohriyama Women’s CollegeKohriyama 963Japan
  3. 3.Research Institute for ChemobiodynamicsChiba UniversityInohana, Chiba 280Japan

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