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Lipid Peroxidation and Retinal Phototoxic Degeneration

  • Robert J. Stephens
  • Dalbir S. Negi
  • Sarah M. Short
  • Frederik J. G. M. van Kuijk
  • Edward A. Dratz
  • David W. Thomas
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 49)

Abstract

Phototoxic degeneration of the retina was first described by Noell, Walker, Kang, and Berman in 1966 and these authors also advanced the theory that polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) oxidation was the causal mechanism responsible for photoreceptor cell degeneration.1 Many investigators have contributed to our current understanding of light damage to the retina, and PUFA oxidation continues to be a prominent theory proposed to explain the mechanism of retinal degeneration.2 PUFA oxidation has also been implicated as an important factor in many other degenerative diseases such as cataract and heart disease.3 Until recently, however, conclusive evidence that lipid peroxidation takes place in vivo under any condition has been elusive.

Keywords

Outer Segment Photoreceptor Cell Retinal Degeneration Retinal Tissue Light Damage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert J. Stephens
    • 1
  • Dalbir S. Negi
    • 1
  • Sarah M. Short
    • 1
  • Frederik J. G. M. van Kuijk
    • 2
  • Edward A. Dratz
    • 2
  • David W. Thomas
    • 1
  1. 1.Cell Biology ProgramSRI InternationalMenlo ParkUSA
  2. 2.Chemistry DepartmentMontana State UniversityBozemanUSA

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