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Bryostatin Stimulation of Human Neutrophil Luminol and DBA (Lucigenin) Chemiluminescence

  • J. T. Warren
  • A. H. Esa
  • G. R. Pettit
  • W. S. May
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 49)

Abstract

Bryostatins are macrocyclic lactones derived from the marine bryozoan Bugula neritina and are currently being investigated for their apparent anti-neoplastic activities.1,2 In addition, certain bryostatins have been shown to share certain properties with the tumor promoting compound 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). These properties include the activation of human neutrophils to generate superoxide anion and the release of specific granules3. In vitro, certain bryostatins also appear to bind and activate the TPA receptor protein kinase-C (PK-C), a process which results in the phosphorylation of nearly identical protein substrates phosphorylated by TPA3.

Keywords

Human Neutrophil Hypochlorous Acid Macrocyclic Lactone Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Sequential Stimulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    G.R. Pettit, C.L. Hearld, Y. Kamano, D. Gust and R. Aoyagi, The structure of Bryostatin 2 from the marine bryoszoan Bugula neritina. J. Nat. Prod. 46:528 (1983.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    G.R. Pettit, C.L. Herald and Y. Kamano, The structure of the Bugula neritina (marine, bryozoa) antineoplastic component Bryostatin 3, J. Org. Chem. 48:5354 (1983).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    R.L. Berkow and A.S. Kraft, Bryostatin, a non-phorbol macrocyclic lactone, activates intact human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and binds to the phorbol ester receptor, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Comm. 131:1109 (1985).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    D. Roos, A.A.M. Bot, M.L.J. van Schaik, M. de Boer and M.R. Daha, Interaction between human neutrophils and zymosan particles: the role of opsonins and divalent cations, J. Immunol. 126:433 (1981).PubMedGoogle Scholar
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    K. Cheung, A.C. Archibald and M.F. Robinson, The origin of chemilum-minescence produced by neutrophils stimulated by opsonized zymosan, J. Immunol. 130:2324 (1983).PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. T. Warren
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. H. Esa
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. R. Pettit
    • 1
    • 2
  • W. S. May
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Hygiene and Public HealthThe Johns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.University of ArizonaPhoenixUSA

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