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The Aging Process

  • Denham Harman
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 49)

Abstract

Aging and death are universal phenomena. Aging is a progressive sequence of age-related, widespread, more-or-less common changes observed in every individual of a given species. These sequential changes are associated with an ever-increasing likelihood of disease and death, beginning at a minimum early in life and increasing until all members of the species are dead by a characteristic age, the maximum life span.

Keywords

Aging Process Free Radical Reaction Average Life Expectancy Average Life Span Maximum Life Span 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Denham Harman
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Medicine and BiochemistryUniversity of Nebraska College of MedicineOmahaUSA

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