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Redox Properties of Oxy and Antioxidant Radicals

  • Slobodan V. Jovanovic
  • Michael G. Simic
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 49)

Abstract

Defense mechanisms against damaging effects of oxy radicals are elaborate and numerous,1-3 which suggests that these mechanisms may have evolved over a long period of time with the development of biological and environmental oxidations which are inadvertently associated with generation of oxy radicals. What are the criteria that determined the choice of defense mechanisms? On the molecular level the efficiency of a particular defense mechanism depends on the reactivities of its subcomponents with oxy radicals, and its ability to reverse or prevent the damaging consequences of oxy radical reactions. Antioxidants are an important part of the defense system. Mechanistic aspects of some well-known and some potential physiological antioxidants are discussed.

Keywords

Redox Potential Redox Property Peroxy Radical Pulse Radiolysis Antioxidant Radical 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Slobodan V. Jovanovic
    • 1
    • 2
  • Michael G. Simic
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear SciencesBeogradYugoslavia
  2. 2.Center for Radiation ResearchNational Bureau StandardsGaithersburgUSA

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