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Effects of Alpha, Beta-Unsaturated Aldehydes on Macrophage and Neutrophil Membrane Function, Fluidity and Sulfhydryl Status

  • Gisela Witz
  • Nancy J. Lawrie
  • Bernard D. Goldstein
  • Jill Ryer-Powder
  • Marie A. Amoruso
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 49)

Abstract

We have postulated that oxidative damage in the lung may be mediated by alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes formed during oxidant stress by ozone. As such, we are investigating the toxic effects of alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes on alveolar macrophages since these are key cells in the lung, important for the detoxification and removal of inhaled particles and for their interaction with lymphoid cells for immune functions. Since many of these functions are critically dependent on the integrity of the macrophage plasma membrane, we have concentrated our efforts on the effects of alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes on macrophage plasma membrane function and dynamic properties. The alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes inhibit the plasma membrane NADPH-dependent oxidase which metabolizes oxygen to superoxide anion radical, a precursor species to bactericidal active oxygen species such as •OH and H2O2. The observed IC50’s for inhibition of the macrophage oxidase are 24, 77 and 240 uM for acrolein, trans-4-hydroxynonenal and crotonaldehyde, respectively.1 Similar IC50’s were obtained for the inhibition by these aldehydes of the corresponding oxidase in human neutrophils.2

Keywords

Alveolar Macrophage Sulfhydryl Group Reactive Aldehyde Lipid Fluidity Superoxide Anion Radical Production 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    G. Witz, N.J. Lawrie, M.A. Amoruso, and B.D. Goldstein, Inhibition by reactive aldehydes of superoxide anion radical production from stimulated polymorphonuclear leukocytes and pulmonary alveolar macrophages. Effects on cellular sulfhydryl groups and NADPH oxidase activity, Biochem. Pharmacol. 36:721 (1987).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    G. Witz, N. J. Lawrie, M. A. Amoruso, and B. D. Goldstein, Inhibition by reactive aldehydes of superoxide anion radical production in stimulated human neutrophils, Chem.-Biol. Interactions 53:13 (1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    E. Schauenstein, H. Esterbauer and H. Zollner, β-Unsaturated aldehydes. In: “Aldehydes in Biological Systems. Their Natural Occurrence and Biological Activities,” Methuen, Inc., New York (1977).Google Scholar
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    M.A. Amoruso, G. Witz, and B.D. Goldstein, Decreased superoxide anion radical production by rat alveolar macrophages following inhalation of ozone or nitrogen dioxide, Life Sci. 28:2215 (1981).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    J.E. Ryer, M.A. Amoruso, B. D. Goldstein, and G. Witz, Ozone inhalation affects rat alveolar macrophage superoxide anion radical production, phagocytosis, membrane lipid fluidity and membrane sulfhydryl group status, Toxicologist 7:127 (1987).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gisela Witz
    • 1
  • Nancy J. Lawrie
    • 1
  • Bernard D. Goldstein
    • 1
  • Jill Ryer-Powder
    • 1
  • Marie A. Amoruso
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Environmental and Community MedicineUMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical SchoolPiscatawayUSA

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