Microsomal Fatty Acid Composition and Ca2+ Uptake Modifications Induced by Sod Depletion in Rat Liver

  • G. M. Bartoli
  • P. Palozza
  • E. Piccioni
  • B. Giannattasio
  • G. Calviello
  • A. M. Guerrera
  • D. Bossi
  • G. Maccauro
  • A. Cittadini
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 49)

Abstract

The hepatic metabolism of certain substances may result in the release of reactive free radicals capable, among other damaging effects, of initiating lipid peroxidation in biological membranes. This effect, in turn, can modify different cell functions.1,2 Animal cells have developed several defense mechanisms against oxygen toxicity, both enzymatic and non-enzymatic. Superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase scavenge initiating reactive species of oxygen; glutathione, α-tocopherol, and ascorbic acid represent species of endogenous antioxidants. The impairment of defense systems should result in the increase of endogenous lipid peroxidation, as in the case of vitamin E and selenium deficiency.3,4 Moreover elevation of intracellular superoxide dismutase correlates with increased resistence toward oxygen toxicity,5 while SOD diminution6 favours the increase of intra-cellular-O2 - production. The aim of this work is to investigate if a diminution of SOD induces an oxidative stress and influences lipid composition and function of rat liver microsomal membranes. For this purpose, we have treated rats with a copper-deficient diet that inhibits Cu-Zn-SOD but does not significantly affect other important enzymes, such as the cytochrome oxidase. During the treatment we have measured hepatic SOD level, fatty acid composition, in vitro lipid peroxidation and Ca2+ uptake of endoplasmic reticulum membranes.

Keywords

Glutathione Ozone Selenium Ketone NADPH 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    R. A. Floyd, Free radicals in arylamine carcinogenesis, in: “Free Radicals in Biology”, Vol. 4, W. A. Pryor, ed., Academic Press, New York (1980).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    R. P. Mason, Free-Radical intermediates in the Metabolism of Toxic Chemicals, in: “Free Radicals in Biology”, Vol. 5 W. A. Pryor, ed., Academic Press, New York (1982).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    D. G. Hafeman and W. G. Hoekstra, Lipid peroxidation in vivo during vitamin E and selenium deficiency in the rat as monitored by ethane evolution, J. Nutr. 107:666 (1977).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    L. A. Herschberge and A. L. Tappel, Effect of vitamin E on pentane exhaled by rats treated with methyl ketone peroxide, Lipids 17:686 (1982).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    B. Freeman, S. L. Young, and J. Crapo, Liposome-mediated augmentation of superoxide dismutase in endothelial cells prevents oxygen injury, J. Biol. Chem. 258:12534 (1983).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    B. D. Goldstein, M. G. Rozen, J. C. Quintavalla, and M. A. Amoruso, Decrease in mouse lung and liver glutathione peroxidase activity and potentiation of the lethal effects of ozone and paraquat by the superoxide dismutase inhibitor diethyldithiocarbamate, Biochem. Pharmacol. 28:27 (1979).CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    D. I. Paynter, R. J. Moir, and E. J. Underwood, Changes in activity of the Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase enzyme in tissues of rat with changes in dietary copper, J. Nutr. 109:1570 (1979).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    J. M. McCord and I. Fridovich, Superoxide dismutase, J. Biol. Chem. 244:6049 (1969).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    F. E. Hunter, J. M. Gebicki, P. E. Hoffsten, J. Weinstein, and A. Scott, Swelling and lysis of rat liver mitochondria induced by ferrous ions, J. Biol. Chem. 238:828 (1963).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    R. F. Borch, Separation of long chain fatty acids as phenacyl esters by high pressure liquid chromatography, Anal. Chem. 47:2437 (1975).CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    L. Moore, Inhibition of liver microsomes calcium pump by in vivo administration of CCl4, CHCl3 and 1,1-dichloroethylene, Biochem. Pharmacol. 29:2505 (1980).CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    G. M. Bartoli, B. Giannattasio, and A. Cittadini, A., The loss of superoxyde dismutase mimics the alteration observed in membranes of tumour cells, in: “Cell Membranes and Cancer”, T. Galeotti, A. Cittadini, G. Neri, S. Papa, and L. A. Smeths, eds., Elsevier Science Publishers B.V., Amsterdam (1985).Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    L. Moore, T. Chen, H. R. J. Knapp, and E. J. Landon, Energy-dependent calcium sequestration activity in rat liver microsomes,J. Biol. Chem. 250:4562 (1975).PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. M. Bartoli
    • 1
  • P. Palozza
    • 1
  • E. Piccioni
    • 1
  • B. Giannattasio
    • 1
  • G. Calviello
    • 1
  • A. M. Guerrera
    • 1
  • D. Bossi
    • 1
  • G. Maccauro
    • 1
  • A. Cittadini
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of General PathologyCatholic UniversityRomeItaly
  2. 2.Department of Cell Biology and PhysiologyUniversity of L’AquilaL’AquilaItaly

Personalised recommendations