Structure and Function of the En/Spm Transposable Element System of ZeaMays: Identification of the Suppressor Component of En

  • Alfons Gierl
  • Heinrich Cuypers
  • Stephanie Lütticke
  • Andy Pereira
  • Zsuzsanna Schwarz-Sommer
  • Sudhansu Dash
  • Peter A. Peterson
  • Heinz Saedler
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 47)

Abstract

The transposable element system Enhancer (En) of Zea mays was originally identified by Peterson (12) at the pale green locus as a mutable allele. Subsequently, the control of this mutability was shown to be homologous to the Suppressor-Mutator (Spm) system (5) both genetically (13) as well as molecularly (11). This system is comprised of two components, one of which (En, Spm) is capable of autonomous transposition and encodes all functions associated with this system. The second component, the nonautonomous Inhibitor (I) (12), is unable to promote transposition but can be trans-activated to transpose by an En/Spm element present in the same genome. Several I elements have been isolated (1,15–17,21,22) which bear the termini of En/Spm but carry internal deletions of varying extent.

Keywords

Maize Codon Guanine Chalcone Active Element 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alfons Gierl
    • 1
  • Heinrich Cuypers
    • 1
  • Stephanie Lütticke
    • 1
  • Andy Pereira
    • 1
  • Zsuzsanna Schwarz-Sommer
    • 1
  • Sudhansu Dash
    • 1
    • 2
  • Peter A. Peterson
    • 1
    • 2
  • Heinz Saedler
    • 1
  1. 1.Max-Planck-Institut für ZüchtungsforschungKöln 30Federal Republic of Germany
  2. 2.Department of AgronomyIowa State UniversityAmesUSA

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