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The Mobile Element Systems in Maize

  • Peter A. Peterson
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 47)

Abstract

Mobile element systems in maize have evolved from a distant curiosity of the 1950s to a prominent subject of study and research of the 1980s that has brought into the scientific arena a large number of investigators. This was largely stimulated by the findings associated with the IS elements, the Mu1 virus, and the Tn series in bacteria.

With the focus of McClintock’s Ac-Ds system and its characteristic activities that include chromosome breakage (Ds-dissociation), it was initially difficult to relate the more ubiquitous P-VV behavior as the same type of phenomenon. More significantly, the mutability associated with Ac was not related to other instances of similar mutability phenomena such as Dt, En, and Spm. Thus, with these initial tests, it was clear that several forms of “control” of mutability could be identified, and these later became identified as “systems.”

The isolation of unique systems such as Fcu, Uq, Bg, Mrh, Mut, Mu1, Cy, and M-st soon followed. There are others, such as MpI-1 at the c2m-3 allele. Other elements unrelated to variegation, such as Bs1, Tz, and the Cin elements, have been molecularly cloned.

The distribution of active elements varies whereby active Uq and Mrh are widely dispersed in corn breeding populations. The Cy element has long been a resident in our genetic materials, having first appeared in a 1966 a2m allele but not identified as such until the isolation of the rcy receptor element at the bz locus.

With the molecular characterization of these elements, their meaning and likely wide dispersal in corn populations will be revealed.

Keywords

Transposable Element Mobile Element Carnegie Institution Receptor Element Corn Population 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter A. Peterson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AgronomyIowa State UniversityAmesUSA

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