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Shape Resonances in Molecular Fields

  • J. L. Dehmer
  • D. Dill
  • A. C. Parr
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSB, volume 181)

Abstract

The last two decades have witnessed remarkable progress in characterizing dynamical aspects of molecular photoionization1,2 and electron-molecule scattering2,3 processes. The general challenge is to gain physical insight into the processes occurring during the excitation, evolution, and decay of the excited molecular complex. Of particular interest in this context are the uniquely molecular aspects resulting from the anisotropy of the molecular field and from the interplay among rovibronic modes. Throughout this work, special attention is invariably drawn to resonant processes, in which the excited system is temporarily trapped in a quasibound resonant state. Such processes tend to amplify the more subtle dynamics of excited molecular states and are often displayed prominently against non-resonant behavior in various physical observables.

Keywords

Molecular Field Shape Resonance Partial Cross Section Centrifugal Barrier Rydberg Series 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. L. Dehmer
    • 1
  • D. Dill
    • 2
  • A. C. Parr
    • 3
  1. 1.Argonne National LaboratoryArgonneUSA
  2. 2.Department of ChemistryBoston UniversityBostonUSA
  3. 3.National Bureau of StandardsGaithersburgUSA

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