Advertisement

Estrogen and Antiestrogen Regulation of Proliferation and Protein Synthesis of Human Breast Cancer Cells

  • Benita S. Katzenellenbogen
  • Yhun Yhong Sheen
  • Catherine E. Snider
  • Yolande Berthois
Part of the Serono Symposia, USA book series (SERONOSYMP)

Abstract

Estrogenic hormones are known to stimulate a variety of biosynthetic processes in hormone-responsive target cells, such as those of the breast and uterus, and nonsteroidal antiestrogens have been shown to antagonize many of the actions of estrogens (1–3). Indeed, antiestrogens have proven to be effective in controlling the growth of estrogen-responsive breast cancers (4). The actions of estrogens appear to be mediated via interaction with an intracellular receptor protein (5–7). Ligand-free estrogen receptors are weakly associated with nuclear components. Following ligand binding, receptor complexes become tightly associated with specific nuclear components, and this association presumably alters gene expression (8–10). Antiestrogens also bind directly to the estrogen receptor, and the resulting antiestrogen-receptor complexes also become associated with chromatin, but presumably block the events which promote cell growth (11,12).

Keywords

Estrogen Receptor Human Breast Cancer Cell Human Breast Cancer Cell Line Antiestrogen Action Estrogen Receptor Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Katzenellenbogen BS, Bhakoo HS, Ferguson ER, et al. Estrogen and antiestrogen action in reproductive tissues and tumors. Recent Prog Horm Res 1979; 35: 259–300.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Katzenellenbogen BS, Miller MA, Mullick A, Sheen YY. Antiestrogen action in breast cancer cells: modulation of proliferation and protein synthesis, and interaction with estrogen receptors and additional antiestrogen binding sites. Breast Cancer Res Treat 1985; 5: 231–43.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Aitken SC, Lippman ME. Effect of estrogens and antiestrogens on growth regulatory enzymes in human breast cancer cells in tissue culture. Cancer Res 1985; 45: 1611–20.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    McGuire WL. Steroid receptor sites in cancer therapy. Adv Intern Med 1979; 24: 127–40.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Sheridan PJ, Buchanan JM, Anselomo VC, Martin PM. Equilibrium. The intracellular distribution of steroid receptors. Nature 1979; 282: 579–84.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Welshons WV, Lieberman ME, Gorski J. Nuclear localization of unoccupied oestrogen receptors. Nature 1984; 307: 747–9.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    King WJ, Greene GL. Monoclonal antibodies localize oestrogen receptor in nuclei of target cells. Nature 1984; 307: 745–7.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Katzenellenbogen BS. Dynamics of steroid hormone receptor action. Annu Rev Physiol 1980; 42: 17–35.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Gorski J, Gannon F. Current models of steroid hormone action: a critique. Annu Rev Physiol 1976; 38: 425–50.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Yamamoto KR. Steroid receptor regulated transcription of specific genes and gene networks. Annu Rev Genet 1985; 19: 209–52.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Katzenellenbogen BS, Miller MA, Mullick A, Sheen YY. Antiestrogen action in breast cancer cells: modulation of proliferation and protein synthesis, and interaction with estrogen receptors and additional antiestrogen binding sites. Breast Cancer Res Treat 1985; 5: 231–43.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Coezy E, Borgna JL, Rochefort H. Tamoxifen and metabolites in MCF-7 cells: correlation between binding to estrogen receptor and inhibition of cell growth. Cancer Res 1982; 42: 317–24.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Soule MD, Vazquez J, Long A, Albert S, Brennan M. A human cell line from a pleural effusion derived from a breast carcinoma. J Natl Cancer Inst 1973; 51: 1409–13.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Lippman ME, Bolan G, Huff K. The effects of estrogen and anti-estrogen on hormone-responsive human breast cancer in long-term tissue culture. Cancer Res 1976; 36: 4595–601.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Katzenellenbogen BS, Norman MJ, Eckert RL, Feltz SW, Mangel WF. Bioactivities, estrogen receptor interactions, and plasminogen activator-inducing activities of tamoxifen and hydroxytamoxifen isomers in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Cancer Res 1984; 44: 112–9.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Westley B, May EB, Brown AM, et al. Effects of antiestrogens on the estrogen regulated pS2 RNA and 52 and 160 kilodalton proteins in MCF-7 cells and two tamoxifen resistant sublines. J Biol Chem 1984; 259: 10030–5.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Westley B, Rochefort H. A secreted glycoprotein induced by estrogen in human breast cancer cell lines. Cell 1980; 20: 353–9.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Edwards DP, Adams DJ, McGuire WL. Estradiol stimulates synthesis of a major intracellular protein in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Breast Cancer Res Treat 1981; 1: 209–15.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Miller MA, Sheen YY, Mullick A, Katzenellenbogen BS. Antiestrogen binding to estrogen receptors and additional antiestrogen binding sites in human breast cancer cells. In: Jordan VC, ed. Estrogen/ antiestrogen action and breast cancer therapy. University of Wisconsin Press, 1986: 127–48.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Miller MA, Katzenellenbogen BS. Characterization and quantitation of antiestrogen binding sites in estrogen receptor-positive and -negative human breast cancer cell lines. Cancer Res 1983; 43: 3094–100.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Sheen YY, Simpson DM, Katzenellenbogen BS. An evaluation of the role of antiestrogen binding sites in mediating the growth modulatory effects of antiestrogens: studies using t-butylphenoxyethyl diethylamine, a compound lacking affinity for estrogen receptor. Endocrinology 1985; 117: 561–4.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Berthois Y, Katzenellenbogen JA, Katzenellenbogen BS. Phenol red in tissue culture media is a weak estrogen: implications concerning the study of estrogen-responsive cells in culture. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1986; 83: 2496–500.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Katzenellenbogen BS, Kendra KL, Norman MJ, Berthois Y. Proliferation, hormonal responsiveness, and estrogen receptor content of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells grown in the short-term and long-term absence of estrogens. Cancer Res 1987; 47: 4355–60.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Sheen YY, Katzenellenbogen BS. Antiestrogen stimulation of the production of a 37,000 molecular weight secreted protein and estrogen stimulation of the production of a 32,000 molecular weight secreted protein in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Endocrinology 1987; 120: 1140–51.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    Welshons WV, Jordon VC. Adaptation of estrogen-dependent MCF-7 cells to low estrogen (phenol red-free) culture. Eur J Cancer Clin Oncol 1987 (in press).Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Dickson RB, Lippman ME. Estrogenic regulation of growth and polypeptide growth factor secretion in human breast carcinoma. Endocr Rev 1987; 8: 29–42.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    Knabbe C, Lippman ME, Wakefield LM, et al. Evidence that transforming growth factor-8 is a hormonally regulated negative growth factor in human breast cancer cells. Cell 1987; 48: 417–28.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. 28.
    Reddel RR, Sutherland RL. Tamoxifen stimulation of human breast cancer cell proliferation in vitro: a possible model for tamoxifen tumor flare. Eur J Cancer Clin Oncol 1984; 20:1419–24.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    Sonnenschein C, Papendorp JT, Soto AM. Estrogenic effect of tamoxif en and its derivatives on the proliferation of MCF-7 human breast tumor cells. Life Sci 1985; 37: 387–94.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. 30.
    Darbre PD, Curtis S, King RJB. Effect of estradiol and tamoxifen on human breast cancer cells in serum-free culture. Cancer Res 1984; 44: 2790–3.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  31. 31.
    Osborne CK, Hobbs K, Clark GM. Effect of estrogens and antiestrogens on growth of human breast cancer cells in athymic nude mice. Cancer Res 1985; 45: 584–90.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  32. 32.
    Bronzert DA, Silverman S, Lippman ME. Estrogen inhibition of a M 39,000 glycoprotein secreted by human breast cancer cells. Cancer Res 1987: 47: 1234–8.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  33. 33.
    Vignon F, Bouton MM, Rochefort H. Antiestrogens inhibit the mitogenic effect of growth factors on breast cancer cells in the total absence of estrogens. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 1987; 146: 1502–8.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benita S. Katzenellenbogen
    • 1
  • Yhun Yhong Sheen
    • 1
  • Catherine E. Snider
    • 1
  • Yolande Berthois
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physiology and BiophysicsUniversity of IllinoisUrbanaUSA

Personalised recommendations