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The National Institutes of Health Experience with Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibodies: Lymphoma, Melanoma, and Colon Cancer

  • Steven Larson
  • Jorge Carrasquillo
  • James Reynolds
  • Andrew Keenan
  • Paul Sugarbaker
  • David Colcher
  • Jeffrey Schlom
  • Ronald Neumann
  • I. Hellström
  • K. Hellström
  • James Mulshine
  • Michael Lotz
  • Paul Strudler
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 152)

Abstract

The hybridoma technique of Kohler and Milstein (1975) permits one to develop monoclonal antibodies (MoABS) against tumor-associated antigens that are highly specific, of very strong avidity for the antigen, and available in large quantities as purified protein. In the last few years, MoABS have been developed against tumor associated antigens for most of the common solid tumors: lung, colon, breast, pancreas, prostate, ovary; as well as some that are not so common, such as melanoma and soft-tissue sarcomas. In addition, MoABS that recognize antigens on hematopoietic neoplasms, such as T- and B-cell lymphomas have been developed. In principle, these monoclonal antibodies can be used as carriers for targeting radionuclides to tumors in vivo, as a means of diagnosis and therapy.

Keywords

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Blood Pool Tumor Uptake Antigen Content Intraperitoneal Therapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven Larson
    • 1
  • Jorge Carrasquillo
    • 1
  • James Reynolds
    • 1
  • Andrew Keenan
    • 1
  • Paul Sugarbaker
    • 1
  • David Colcher
    • 1
  • Jeffrey Schlom
    • 1
  • Ronald Neumann
    • 1
  • I. Hellström
    • 1
  • K. Hellström
    • 1
  • James Mulshine
    • 1
  • Michael Lotz
    • 1
  • Paul Strudler
    • 1
  1. 1.National Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA

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