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Tissue Localization and Migration of Murine Spleen Macrophages Carrying the Forssman Glycosphingolipid Antigen

  • Peter Conradt
  • Rainer v. Kleist
  • Peter F. Mühlradt
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 237)

Abstract

Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are receptors for virus (1), bacteria (2) and toxins (3). Their functions, if any, for the cells on whose surface they are expressed are still unclear. Recent data suggest the involvement of a sulfated GSL (4) in the cell-cell interactions of developing nervous tissue (5).

Keywords

Peritoneal Cell Nonspecific Esterase Murine Spleen Peritoneal Leukocyte Spleen Section 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Conradt
    • 1
  • Rainer v. Kleist
    • 1
  • Peter F. Mühlradt
    • 1
  1. 1.GBF, Gesellschaft für Biotechnologische Forschung Immunobiology GroupBraunschweigGermany

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