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MEL-14 and LFA-1, Organ Specific and Non-Specific Adhesion Molecules Involved in Homing of Human Lymphocytes

  • Steven T. Pals
  • Annelies den Otter
  • Frank Miedema
  • Peter Kabel
  • Gerrit D. Keizer
  • Rik J. Scheper
  • Chris J. L. M. Meijer
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 237)

Abstract

In the process of recirculation lymphocytes migrate from the blood into the surrounding tissues by adhering to and crossing the wall of high endothelial venules (1–4). Recently we and others have provided evidence that in man, like in rodents, a system of organ-specific receptors mediates lymphocyte-HEV recognition and thus presumably controls lymphocyte homing to lymphoid tissues and sites of inflammation (4–7).

Keywords

Human Lymphocyte Peripheral Lymph Node High Endothelial Venule Significant Additive Effect Lymphocyte Recirculation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven T. Pals
    • 1
  • Annelies den Otter
    • 1
  • Frank Miedema
    • 2
  • Peter Kabel
    • 1
  • Gerrit D. Keizer
    • 3
  • Rik J. Scheper
    • 1
  • Chris J. L. M. Meijer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PathologyFree UniversityAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Central Laboratory of The Netherlands Red Cross Blood Transfusion Service, incorporating the laboratory for Exp. and Clin. ImmunologyUniversity of AmsterdamThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Department of ImmunologyThe Netherlands Cancer InstituteAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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