Lymphoid Dendritic Cells in Rheumatoid Tissue and Normal Blood — Characteristics and Functions

  • K. Waalen
  • Ø. Førre
  • J. B. Natvig
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 237)


Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a disease of unknown etiology, is characterized by a chronic inflammation with an extensive infiltration of lymphocytes in the synovial membrane of these patients. Immuno-histological studies of RA synovial tissue (ST) have also revealed an increased infiltration of strongly HLA-DR positive cells with dendritic morphology (1). These cells are in close contact with T helper (CD4 )lymphocytes and are organized in germinal centers (1,2). In order to characterize the function of rheumatoid synovial dendritic cells (DC)in vitro, methods for isolation of these cells have been established (3). Recent studies have revealed that synovial DC have functions comparable to blood DC. Thus they are potent accessory cells for T cell activation (3,4). Furthermore, interleukin 1 (IL-1) production has been shown to be necessary for synovial and blood DC in order to exhibit accessory functions (4,5). Synovial and blood DC have been further investigated with respect to expression of cell membrane markers, to accessory function and expression of HLA-DR antigens after short term culture, and with respect to cluster formation with autologous and allogeneic T cells. DC were isolated as described previously (3).Briefly, T cells were removed from the Isopaque-Ficoll separated mononuclear cells and non adherent cells isolated by incubation on plastic for 45 minutes. Semiadherent cells (including DC) were collected from the non T adherent cells after over night culture, and Fc-receptor positive cells were removed by incubation on IgG-coated culture dishes.


Dendritic Cell Synovial Fluid Synovial Tissue Dendritic Morphology Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Tissue 


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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Waalen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ø. Førre
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. B. Natvig
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Immunology and RheumatologyUniversity of Oslo The National HospitalOsloNorway
  2. 2.Oslo Sanitetsforenings Rheumatism HospitalOsloNorway

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