Relaxing the Death Standard for Organ Donation in Pediatric Situations

  • John A. Robertson


A major ethical and legal constraint in organ procurement is the requirement that organs be removed only from dead patients. Although kidneys and bone marrow are obtained from living donors, the dead donor rule controls the procurement of hearts, livers, and most kidneys. Brain-death tests of death permit the removal of these organs from heart-beating but brain-dead sources.


Organ Donation Brain Death Active Killing Organ Source Organ Procurement 


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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • John A. Robertson
    • 1
  1. 1.School of LawUniversity of Texas at AustinAustinUSA

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