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Characterization of Metal Complex Positive Ions in the Gas Phase by Photoelectron Spectroscopy

  • Dennis L. Lichtenberger
  • Glen Eugene Kellogg
Part of the Modern Inorganic Chemistry book series (MICE)

Abstract

The remarkable contributions of metals and metal-containing species to chemical and material behavior are rooted in the electronic and bonding interaction capabilities of the metal atoms themselves. Diverse theoretical and experimental investigations have been directed toward advancing the understanding of these interactions. Significant new insights have been accomplished in recent years as a consequence of major improvements in instrumentation and modeling methods. One area in which the progress is particularly noteworthy is the study of metal-metal and metal-molecule interactions in the gas phase. Gas phase studies make possible detailed and high-resolution spectroscopic characterization of metal-containing species without the complicating (and spectroscopic broadening) factors of solution or solid state investigations. In the gas phase it is possible to characterize reactive intermediates, excited states, and other short-lived species that are essential to developing the full picture of the properties of these systems. Furthermore, the species in the gas phase contain a discrete number of metal atoms and bound molecules or fragments, and therefore are amenable to detailed theoretical modeling using the most advanced methods available.

Keywords

Ionization Energy Photoelectron Spectrum Neutral Molecule Bond Dissociation Energy Ionization Band 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dennis L. Lichtenberger
    • 1
  • Glen Eugene Kellogg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA

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