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Photodissociation of Metal-Containing Gas Phase Ions

  • Robert C. Dunbar
Part of the Modern Inorganic Chemistry book series (MICE)

Abstract

As this volume makes clear, chemical study of charged molecules has played a major role in the rapid progress of gas phase inorganic chemistry. A constant difficulty in studying gas phase ions is the relative scarcity of powerful tools for characterizing the molecules, since most of the array of methods which make conventional neutral-molecule chemistry a tractable field of study, such as NMR, ESR, chromatography, optical activity, and IR/Raman, are not now feasible for gaseous ions. Photodissociation holds the outstanding promise of filling some of this gap†: Through photodissociation spectroscopy, it supplies optical spectroscopic information corresponding to that provided by visible/UV spectroscopy (and perhaps eventually to that provided by IR as well), while the observation of the photofragmentation patterns is effectively a way of performing mass spectrometric analysis on the ionic molecules. It is the rapidly growing application of these methods to the new frontier of gas phase metal ion chemistry that inspires this chapter.

Keywords

Kinetic Energy Release Expansion Nozzle Photodissociation Spectrum Metal Carbonyl Cluster Bond Insertion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert C. Dunbar
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryCase Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA

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