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Assessment of Juvenile Psychopathology for Legal Purposes

  • Richard Rosner
Part of the Critical Issues in American Psychiatry and the Law book series (CIAP, volume 4)

Abstract

The assessment of juvenile psychopathology for legal purposes differs from such assessment for clinical purposes in that the ends of law differ from the ends of medicine. Whereas medical ends are therapeutic, legal ends are not. This fundamental distinction affects the entire process of consultation regarding the mental condition of juveniles.

Keywords

Adolescent Psychiatry Child Psychiatry Expert Testimony Expert Witness Emotional Tone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard Rosner
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Forensic PsychiatryClinic of the New York Criminal and Supreme CourtsNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryNew York University School of MedicineNew YorkUSA

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