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Biofeedback, Autogenic Therapy, Meditation, and Hypnosis

  • Benjamin B. Wolman

Abstract

Biofeedback is a feedback of biological information. It represents a flow of information displayed to an individual concerning his or her internal physiological processes, such as heart beat, brain rhythm, and muscular tension (Olton & Noonberg, 1980; Yates, 1980).

Keywords

Irritable Bowel Syndrome Migraine Headache Tension Headache Biofeedback Training Biofeedback Therapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benjamin B. Wolman

There are no affiliations available

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