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Basic Premises

  • Benjamin B. Wolman

Abstract

The treatment of psychosomatic disorders necessitates the cooperation of several professions. The prevention of psychosomatic disorders requires the help and guidance of pediatricians, child psychologists, child psychiatrists, social workers, guidance workers, and educators, for many psychosomatic problems are related to parent-child interaction and other types of social relations. Moreover, although psychosomatic problems are not innate, a search for a genetic predisposition is usually advisable. The treatment process itself depends on the skills of psychiatrists, psychologists, and psychoanalysts, with the close cooperation of psychiatric social workers and quite often medical practitioners in a variety of fields, including, sometimes, the entire hospital staff.

Keywords

Peptic Ulcer Physical Symptom Peptic Ulcer Disease Psychosomatic Medicine Psychotherapeutic Treatment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benjamin B. Wolman

There are no affiliations available

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