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Psychosomatic Aspects of Cancer

  • Benjamin B. Wolman

Abstract

The term cancer covers over 100 different diseases. Their common denominator is an unrestrained proliferation of abnormal cells that form malignant tumors. Cancer can be defined as a hyperplasia of glandular or epithelial cells that infiltrates and inevitably destroys. When cancer starts in the epithelial tissues, it is a carcinoma; when it starts in connective tissues, it is a sarcoma.

Keywords

Breast Cancer Lung Cancer Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia American Cancer Society 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benjamin B. Wolman

There are no affiliations available

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