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Perspectives of Current and Recent Minority MBA Students on Advancement in Management Careers

  • Nancy DiTomaso
  • Donna E. Thompson
Part of the Plenum Studies in Work and Industry book series (SSWI)

Abstract

The record clearly shows that prior to the civil rights movement, there were few minorities in top management positions in major corporations (see, for example, Davis’s article in this volume for documentation of this claim). And, even today, as discussed in Chapters 1 and 2, minorities are overrepresented in humanities and social science fields and in the public sector, whereas they are underrepresented in business, science, and engineering. Given the history of minority concentration in nonbusiness fields, it is also clear that those minorities who entered management jobs during and just after the civil rights movement often came from nonbusiness backgrounds. Many, therefore, entered jobs within corporations, namely personnel, public relations, and other related staff jobs, which were closest to the fields of training that they had outside corporations. Thus, some have argued that the ceiling on minority advancement is partly a reflection of the composition of the group of minority managers who entered corporate careers long enough ago to now be in middle management and therefore part of the pool of potential candidates for top management positions.

Keywords

Affirmative Action Black Male Minority Status Black Female Career Aspiration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nancy DiTomaso
    • 1
  • Donna E. Thompson
    • 1
  1. 1.Rutgers Graduate School of ManagementNewarkUSA

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