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High-Brightness RF Linear Accelerators

  • Robert A. Jameson
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSB, volume 178)

Abstract

Soon after electrons and ions were discovered, production of practical generators of particle beams began, and a succession of machines were invented that could produce more energetic and more intense beams. Progress on the energy frontier is often charted from the 1930s in the form of the Livingston Chart, Fig. 1, showing that particle accelerator energy has increased by a factor of about 25 every 10 years. The corresponding cost per million electron volts has decreased by about a factor of 16 per decade (Lawson, 1982). The physics principles on which all of these devices work were deduced long ago; the energy increase were possible because of cost reductions from thorough exploitation of parameters, engineering perfection, systems integration, and advanced manufacturing methods (Voss, 1982).

Keywords

Linear Accelerator Emittance Growth Intense Beam Electron Linac Synchronous Phase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert A. Jameson
    • 1
  1. 1.Accelerator Technology Division MS H811Los Alamos National LaboratoryLos AlamosUSA

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