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Growth Hormone Receptors in Rat Adipocytes

  • H. Maurice Goodman
  • Erela Gorin
  • Genevieve Grichting
  • Thomas W. Honeyman
  • Jaroslaw Szecowka
  • Lih-Ruey Tai
  • Leonard R. Waice
Part of the Serono Symposia, USA book series (SERONOSYMP)

Abstract

Like other peptide and protein hormones, GH is thought to produce its biological effects by interacting with specific receptors on the surface of target cells. Understanding of GH receptors lags behind that of other hormone receptors, in part because GH receptors are scarce, and in part because there has been little agreement on what constitutes a good in vitro model to study GH action. Furthermore, because at least some of the in vivo actions of GH are mediated by insulin-like growth factors, attention has been diverted to study of these receptors. GH, however, does produce direct metabolic effects, particularly on adipose tissue, and although we do not know how these effects are related to growth, metabolic actions may be important even after growth has terminated.

Keywords

Growth Hormone Sialic Acid Human Growth Hormone Growth Hormone Receptor Binding Unit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Maurice Goodman
    • 1
  • Erela Gorin
    • 1
  • Genevieve Grichting
    • 1
  • Thomas W. Honeyman
    • 1
  • Jaroslaw Szecowka
    • 1
  • Lih-Ruey Tai
    • 1
  • Leonard R. Waice
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyUniversity of Massachusetts Medical SchoolWorcesterUSA

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