Analgesics and Sports Medicine

  • Charles R. Craig


Because pain is the most common reason for seeing a physician and because it is often associated with athletic endeavors (the adage “no pain, no gain” is still accepted as dogma by many), a consideration of the properties of analgesic drugs is essential in a publication such as this.


Analgesic Drug Methyl Salicylate Narcotic Analgesic Abstinence Syndrome Respiratory Depressant 


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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles R. Craig
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacology and ToxicologyWest Virginia University Health Sciences CenterMorgantownUSA

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