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The Respiratory Burst and the Onset of Human Labor, Preterm Labor, and Premature Rupture of the Membranes

  • Curtis L. Cetrulo
  • Anthony J. Sbarra
  • Anjan Chaudhury
  • Mark T. Peters
  • Charles J. Lockwood
  • Gail Thomas
  • Joseph L. KennedyJr.
  • Farid Louis
  • Chris J. Shaker
  • Horn-Wen Wang

Abstract

The respiratory burst is implicated in many different and diverse areas of biology. This should not be surprising. If phagocytosis and/or pinocytosis are truly the mechanisms that cells use for eating and drinking, one should expect no boundaries. In the field of obstetrics, the respiratory burst may be implicated in the onset of human labor, preterm labor, and premature rupture of the fetal membranes. The common denominator in all these events could well be brought about by phagocytosis or a phagocytosis-like phenomenon and the accompanying respiratory burst.

Keywords

Amniotic Fluid Lysosomal Enzyme Respiratory Burst Brain Heart Infusion Premature Rupture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Curtis L. Cetrulo
    • 1
    • 2
  • Anthony J. Sbarra
    • 2
    • 3
  • Anjan Chaudhury
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mark T. Peters
    • 1
    • 2
  • Charles J. Lockwood
    • 1
    • 2
  • Gail Thomas
    • 2
    • 3
  • Joseph L. KennedyJr.
    • 4
  • Farid Louis
    • 5
  • Chris J. Shaker
    • 1
    • 2
  • Horn-Wen Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Maternal Fetal MedicineSt. Margaret’s Hospital for WomenBostonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyTufts University School of MedicineBostonUSA
  3. 3.Department of Medical Research and LaboratoriesSt. Margaret’s Hospital for WomenBostonUSA
  4. 4.Department of PediatricsSt. Margaret’s Hospital for WomenBostonUSA
  5. 5.Department of PathologySt. Margaret’s Hospital for WomenBostonUSA

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