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Circulatory Adjustments to Anemic Hypoxia

  • Stephen M. Cain
  • Christopher K. Chapler
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 227)

Abstract

Oxygen transfer in the circulation can be reduced in a number of ways, as Barcroft described many years ago (Barcroft, 1920). Following his nomenclature, we will describe some of the circulatory responses to hypoxic hypoxia (Barcroft’s anoxic type), which is a condition of lowered arterial PO2, and to anemic hypoxia, which is a condition of lowered arterial O2 concentration. Most attention will be directed toward the latter type because, in the case of experimental hemodilution particularly, there are some fascinating differences from hypoxic hypoxia that occur for reasons that are not immediately obvious.

Keywords

Carotid Body Hypoxic Hypoxia Limb Blood Flow Acute Anemia Vasoconstrictor Tone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen M. Cain
    • 1
  • Christopher K. Chapler
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Physiology and BiophysicsUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamBirminghamUSA
  2. 2.Department of PhysiologyQueen’s UniversityKingstonCanada

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