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O2 Transport in the Horse During Rest and Exercise

  • Gail L. Landgren
  • Jerry R. Gillespie
  • M. Roger Fedde
  • Bryon W. Jones
  • Richard L. Pieschl
  • Peter D. Wagner
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 227)

Abstract

We studied mechanisms of O2 transport in 6 adult (2–5 year old) horses at rest and during steady-state exercise on a treadmill (0% slope) at 12 m/s (a submaximal gallop). Oxygen consumption was measured using an open-flow system. Arterial and mixed venous blood samples were simultaneously obtained for measurement of O2 content and hemoglobin concentration. \(\rm\dot{v}\)O2 increased from 1.5±0.2 L/min at rest to 46.2±4.8 L/min during exercise. HR increased from a resting value of 36.9±2.5 bpm to 196.5±10.9 bpm and the arterio-venous O2 content difference (a-\(\rm\bar{V}\) O2) increased from 4.2±0.8 ml O2/100 ml blood to 20.3±1.6 ml O2/100 ml blood.

The 30.4-fold increase in oxygen consumption in the horse at submaximal \(\rm\dot{v}\)O2 versus only a 10-fold increase in man at \(\rm\dot{v}\)O2 max demonstrates the marked ability of the horse to transfer O2 at each step in the O2 transport pathway.

Keywords

Aerobic Capacity Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrion American Lung Association Marked Ability Bias Flow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gail L. Landgren
    • 1
  • Jerry R. Gillespie
    • 1
  • M. Roger Fedde
    • 2
  • Bryon W. Jones
    • 3
  • Richard L. Pieschl
    • 2
  • Peter D. Wagner
    • 4
  1. 1.Departments of Surgery & MedicineKansas State UniversityManhattanUSA
  2. 2.Anatomy & PhysiologyKansas State UniversityManhattanUSA
  3. 3.College of Veterinary Medicine and Institute for Environmental ResearchKansas State UniversityManhattanUSA
  4. 4.Section of Physiology, Department of MedicineUniversity of California-San DiegoLa JollaUSA

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