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Oxygen Transfer in the Trained and Untrained Quarter Horse

  • H. H. Erickson
  • W. L. Sexton
  • B. K. Erickson
  • J. R. Coffman
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 227)

Abstract

The recognition of the horse as a natural athlete has led to increased interest in equine sports medicine, exercise physiology, new training methods, and factors improving the performance of horses (Engelhardt, 1977; Milne et al., 1977; Bayly et al., 1983b; Persson et al., 1983). A considerable amount of research has been performed in recent years in order to describe the physiological responses of the horse to exercise and training (for reviews see Engelhardt, 1977; Physick-Sheard, 1985; Rose, 1985). Most of these studies, however, have examined the effects of acute exercise training rather than long-term, strenuous exercise training similar to that of a competitive performance horse. Furthermore, there are very few studies that describe the equine athlete’s response to detraining, how soon it starts, how much of it occurs, and how rapidly a horse can be retrained and placed back in competition. The purpose of this study was to: (1) evaluate selected cardiopulmonary and metabolic responses of the Quarter Horse to a standard exercise (treadmill) test during a 25-week program of endurance and interval training and (2) to examine the effects of an extended period of detraining and subsequent retraining on exercise performance.

Keywords

Exercise Training Exercise Test Blood Lactate Endurance Training Blood Lactate Concentration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. H. Erickson
    • 1
  • W. L. Sexton
    • 1
  • B. K. Erickson
    • 1
  • J. R. Coffman
    • 1
  1. 1.College of Veterinary MedicineKansas State UniversityManhattanUSA

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